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Are Social Media Influencers Good Stewards of your Brand?

You hear about them all the time, these so-called “social media influencers.” They’re people or groups with massive amounts of followers or subscribers online who get paid to appear at locations or promote products in their feeds. The hope from brands hosting them is that their popularity garners tons of positive publicity in an otherwise crowded media landscape.

This week, Six Flags Over Texas opened themselves up to a group of YouTube Influencers, hoping to drum up some good publicity and positive coverage. Sadly, it appears they got neither.

The Arlington theme park hosted YouTube celebrity “Mr. Beast” – whose real name is Jimmy Donaldson – for two days. His goals? To win every prize in the park and give $20,000 to whomever on his crew could ride a coaster the longest.

Standard YouTube fare these days.

Unfortunately, the first video featuring the park’s many, different games exposed a little secret: not all of the prizes shown at games can actually be won.

They’re referred to as “display prizes” throughout the video by employees. So while you definitely can’t win those prizes, you can definitely pay to play said game under those prizes. That just seems like false advertising to me.

That alone wasn’t a good look for the park, but 17 million or so views later, “display prizes” at Six Flags are now definitely in the public domain. Now, that’s not to say other parks or chains don’t do the same thing, but that doesn’t make it any more right to do in my humble opinion.

But that’s not the worst thing to come out of these appearances, sadly.

In the second video uploaded, Mr. Beast and Crew rode the park’s Mini Mine Train, with the promise of whoever survived the longest would win $20,000.

Good work if you can get it!

Now, if you can get past the fact that Mr. Beast is standing in the danger zone as a train is being dispatched:

Yes, you can be on a ride platform during private video shoots. But that close to a moving train?

You’ll then get to these truly jaw-dropping moments: when the team encouraged young on-lookers to toss them small food items while they were on the ride:

Now, credit given where it’s due: the team does not start the food tossing conversation – a guest did – but the influencers encouraged it.

Also, the team does acknowledge in passing that, “…we’ve started a problem,” and that it, “…probably wasn’t a great idea.”

That being said, the very next scene featured a team member openly asking if they could, “…come back with an Xbox on the next trip?”

That was immediately followed with a scene featuring another team member, holding a loose t-shirt dangerously close to the ride’s moving wheels, tossing it from the moving train to the crowd of on-lookers on the other side of the safety fence:

Note how close his hand and loose t-shirt is to the ride’s moving wheels.
Pretty sure you’re not supposed to be tossing stuff from rides to guests…

Anyone else seeing some mixed messages here in the edit? Imagine if you’re one of the channel’s younger, target audience. Does a passing warning even register with them?

What’s truly befuddling is that all of this could have been entirely prevented. It appears the park had no say in the final edit of the video – which is unfortunate. Scenes like these should have never seen the light of day, let alone be allowed to occur during filming.

In an ironic twist, while the two videos have received a combined 37 million views (and climbing), the park (actually just the Six Flags brand) received a total of *one* direct mention across both videos. Unless you recognized the park from a previous visit, you’d have to do some serious sleuthing to figure out where the heck this place is.

Consider the amount of resources that were needed to pull off these shoots and you have to ask the question, “Did the park get the most for their money?”

With all that being said, the park ended up looking like a victim and got the very raw end of the deal. Not only were they barely mentioned, they were shown featuring prizes you can’t win and had their safety rules flaunted, captured and broadcast to millions of young subscribers (the company’s core market).

Mr. Beast, on the other hand? They got two new videos, 37 million+ new views and tons more ad revenue. Is this a fair trade?

Influencer Marketing is a fast growing sector, with more and more brands leveraging it as an additional tool in their marketing toolbox. Incidents like these are a good reminder that just because someone says they have a lot of “influence,” and wants to “work” with you, doesn’t mean you should sacrifice the image or safety of your attraction to get it.