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True Enthusiasts

After observing and working in this industry for over 15 years, I’ve found there to be two types of people that enjoy amusement / theme parks in this country: those who visit to enjoy themselves with their friends and families; and those who visit the park to criticize every facet of the park or people who enjoy attractions that they do not.

I’ve dubbed them, “enthusiasts and enthusi-asses,” respectably.

I bring this up because there is an event occurring over the next few weekends along the Jersey shore that highlights this disparity within the ranks of those who consider themselves as “fans” of amusement parks – and has re-affirmed my belief in humanity.

First, a little background –

Sandy brought devastation to several seaside amusement parks in New Jersey and countless billions in damage elsewhere in the United States. Photo Credit: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen/U.S. Air Force/New Jersey National Guard.

Sandy brought devastation to several seaside amusement parks in New Jersey and countless billions in damage elsewhere in the United States. Photo Credit: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen/U.S. Air Force/New Jersey National Guard.

Hurricane Sandy devastated the East Coast, with millions affected. Some of the most visible victims were the traditional, seaside amusement parks of New Jersey. When the first photos of the damage came in, the striking photo of a pleasure pier – with rides partially submerged in the surf – became one of the many iconic photos of the disaster. Several other seaside amusement parks, including Keansburg Amusement Park fell victim to the same fate along the East Coast’s shore.

It was a dark time for the owners of these traditional parks, many of which have been in the family for generations. With the storm still wreaking havoc, some people took to the internet to thank the hurricane for destroying certain rides, as if they somehow deserved this fate.

They never seemed to post anything about the families who had invested so much of their personal savings to purchase and install the rides; Let alone the incredible financial burden that was sure to follow.

A person who “enjoys” a specific hobby and who seems to only care about themselves and not others – I’d describe that person as an “enthusi-ass,” wouldn’t you?

So now, we come to the other side of the spectrum, to the “enthusiast.” Once the damage was fully accounted for and insurance issues resolved – the New Jersey region of the American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) decided that they were not going to stand for stupidity. They took to the internet, not to flame, troll or degrade an already bad situation…

No – they sprang into action.

The New Jersey chapter of the American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) decided to use the internet for good, by giving back to the very park that gave to them, which makes them true "enthusiasts" in every sense of the word.

The New Jersey chapter of the American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) decided to use the internet for good, by giving back to the very park that gave to them, which makes them true “enthusiasts” in every sense of the word.

The region created a repeating event they dubbed, “Dig out the Wildcat.” Its purpose: to assist the family owned Keansburg Amusement Park in removing deposited sand around their Wildcat roller coaster.

People helping people. Via the internet. Not yelling or flaming one another.

What a novel concept.

What will happen in the small, family owned amusement park on the Keansburg shore over the next few weekends is proof-positive that there still are good people in this world. Over 20 people have expressed interest in the event.

Even better, that group of people – who share the common bond of enjoying amusement parks – can unite to help out the very people that allow them to enjoy life to the fullest.

They know that there’s no opportunities for rides, or the coveted “exclusive ride time,” no – they simply want to help out their fellow human beings.

True “enthusiasts” in every sense of the word. True enthusiasts talk with action. In this case, it’s with buckets and shovels.

At least now we can see the true enthusiasts use their hands for good.

I only wish that I could get out there myself and assist them.

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4 responses

  1. John Dough

    This is worse than the guy who sabotaged the efforts to save the Big Dipper coaster at Geauga Lake and claimed it was a “parody”.

    Or remember the other guy who said it didn’t matter if the March 2011 tsunami wiped out the coasters because they already “had the credits”?

    Oh wait. It’s the SAME guy, being an @$$#0£€, yet again.

    Why tiptoe around the issue? Why not name the name? That’s the only part I don’t understand.

    January 12, 2013 at 1:57 am

    • Thanks for the comment!

      You know, I just felt that it wasn’t worth my time and effort to mention the person or group you are referring to by name.

      Plus, the article hopes to spin a positive image of the enthusiast, and the success they’re having – despite the continued efforts of one for-profit organization.

      January 12, 2013 at 9:07 am

  2. Sammy

    Yea if you mention the name, the minion invasion begins and before ya know it you’re doing as much damage control as he does on any given day!

    January 13, 2013 at 6:49 am

    • Precisely, Sammy.

      Besides, I’d rather not give any publicity to that person’s “brand.”

      Rather, I wanted to point out how TRUE enthusiasts are making a positive difference in their communities!

      Thanks for the comment!

      January 15, 2013 at 5:36 pm