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Posts tagged “safety

False active shooter report leads to panic inside California’s Great America

It gives me no pleasure to write a piece about this, but I think it IS important to see what happens when societal paranoia meets the reality of our society.

On Saturday night, reports began to circulate online of a group of disruptive teenagers inside California’s Great America. As part of a strong-arm robbery attempt inside the park, someone began shouting “SHOOTER,” inciting mass panic among the attendees.

Guests began running for any exit they could find, including making their own by scaling large, barbed wire fences in backstage areas.

Police scanner traffic reported a few some minor to moderate injures, consistent with trampling crowds, but that no shooting had occurred. There was no word if the group responsible for the false shooting reports were taken into custody.

The park put out a statement about 30 minutes after police arrived, saying:

They concluded with, “The safety of our guests and associates is our highest priority.”

Now, growing up at this park, it is beyond heartbreaking to watch a place I had so much fun in, turn into a place of pure, unadulterated terror. In an era where we drill our students about mass shooters in school, is it much of a stretch to see theme / amusement parks as a soft target? Sadly, no.

That being said, the security to get into theme / amusement parks like Great America is very good. I’ve never felt unsafe at a park event, except for what no security checkpoint can detect: bad actors. A person or group of people who are determined to hurt others in order to make themselves feel better.

The physical damage to the park is repairable. However, the reputation damage to the park and mental damage to those who were in attendance (both guests and employees) is not as easily repaired.

Are there are lessons to be learned here? Absolutely. I imagine parks across the country will be taking a look at their emergency and crisis plans to ensure this never happens at their parks.

But truth be told, we (as a nation) cannot allow ourselves to be so paranoid – and yet, here we are. That being said, after seeing all of these videos over and over, if I were placed in their shoes, I ask myself, “What would I do?”

P/C: California’s Great America.

I finish this op / ed with a question for all of us: Is this the type of country we want to live in? A country in which one bad actor can incite a mass panic, over the generally unfounded fear of someone gunning us down?

Because as much as we want this to be an isolated incident – barring radical change in our society – I’m fearful that this sort of occurrence is only the tip of the iceberg.


Are Social Media Influencers Good Stewards of your Brand?

You hear about them all the time, these so-called “social media influencers.” They’re people or groups with massive amounts of followers or subscribers online who get paid to appear at locations or promote products in their feeds. The hope from brands hosting them is that their popularity garners tons of positive publicity in an otherwise crowded media landscape.

This week, Six Flags Over Texas opened themselves up to a group of YouTube Influencers, hoping to drum up some good publicity and positive coverage. Sadly, it appears they got neither.

The Arlington theme park hosted YouTube celebrity “Mr. Beast” – whose real name is Jimmy Donaldson – for two days. His goals? To win every prize in the park and give $20,000 to whomever on his crew could ride a coaster the longest.

Standard YouTube fare these days.

Unfortunately, the first video featuring the park’s many, different games exposed a little secret: not all of the prizes shown at games can actually be won.

They’re referred to as “display prizes” throughout the video by employees. So while you definitely can’t win those prizes, you can definitely pay to play said game under those prizes. That just seems like false advertising to me.

That alone wasn’t a good look for the park, but 17 million or so views later, “display prizes” at Six Flags are now definitely in the public domain. Now, that’s not to say other parks or chains don’t do the same thing, but that doesn’t make it any more right to do in my humble opinion.

But that’s not the worst thing to come out of these appearances, sadly.

In the second video uploaded, Mr. Beast and Crew rode the park’s Mini Mine Train, with the promise of whoever survived the longest would win $20,000.

Good work if you can get it!

Now, if you can get past the fact that Mr. Beast is standing in the danger zone as a train is being dispatched:

Yes, you can be on a ride platform during private video shoots. But that close to a moving train?

You’ll then get to these truly jaw-dropping moments: when the team encouraged young on-lookers to toss them small food items while they were on the ride:

Now, credit given where it’s due: the team does not start the food tossing conversation – a guest did – but the influencers encouraged it.

Also, the team does acknowledge in passing that, “…we’ve started a problem,” and that it, “…probably wasn’t a great idea.”

That being said, the very next scene featured a team member openly asking if they could, “…come back with an Xbox on the next trip?”

That was immediately followed with a scene featuring another team member, holding a loose t-shirt dangerously close to the ride’s moving wheels, tossing it from the moving train to the crowd of on-lookers on the other side of the safety fence:

Note how close his hand and loose t-shirt is to the ride’s moving wheels.
Pretty sure you’re not supposed to be tossing stuff from rides to guests…

Anyone else seeing some mixed messages here in the edit? Imagine if you’re one of the channel’s younger, target audience. Does a passing warning even register with them?

What’s truly befuddling is that all of this could have been entirely prevented. It appears the park had no say in the final edit of the video – which is unfortunate. Scenes like these should have never seen the light of day, let alone be allowed to occur during filming.

In an ironic twist, while the two videos have received a combined 37 million views (and climbing), the park (actually just the Six Flags brand) received a total of *one* direct mention across both videos. Unless you recognized the park from a previous visit, you’d have to do some serious sleuthing to figure out where the heck this place is.

Consider the amount of resources that were needed to pull off these shoots and you have to ask the question, “Did the park get the most for their money?”

With all that being said, the park ended up looking like a victim and got the very raw end of the deal. Not only were they barely mentioned, they were shown featuring prizes you can’t win and had their safety rules flaunted, captured and broadcast to millions of young subscribers (the company’s core market).

Mr. Beast, on the other hand? They got two new videos, 37 million+ new views and tons more ad revenue. Is this a fair trade?

Influencer Marketing is a fast growing sector, with more and more brands leveraging it as an additional tool in their marketing toolbox. Incidents like these are a good reminder that just because someone says they have a lot of “influence,” and wants to “work” with you, doesn’t mean you should sacrifice the image or safety of your attraction to get it.


Amusement parks are not trying to purposely hurt or kill you

It seems like every week this summer, the news has stories of horrific injuries or deaths at an amusement park. With that, comes the predictable “I knew that ride wasn’t safe. They should have never opened it,” chatter online.

But, as hard to believe as it is: Amusement parks are not trying to hurt or kill you.

Around the turn of the century, things were different. Rides were a new concept and safety systems were, well – non-existent. In fact, a ride with a “killer” reputation was actually MORE popular, as people were willing to test their mettle against the machine.

The Revere Beach Lightning was one of Harry Traver's "Terrifying Triplets" and it earned that moniker by killing a rider on the first day of operation. Today a ride like this would never make it past the drawing board.

The Revere Beach Lightning was one of Harry Traver’s “Terrifying Triplets” and it earned that moniker by killing a rider on the first day of operation.

But as the industry matured, so also did it’s guests – and the demand went from a killer coaster to a safer one. Manufacturers responded with the lap bar, seat belt and over the shoulder restraint.

It’s no longer in the best interest of a park to have a ride that’s not safe – and that’s been the case since the 1920’s. Coasters and flat rides can be millions of dollars of investment – and one accident could turn that investment into a fancy lawn ornament. 

Yeah, there’s always the exceptions to the rule, but thankfully in this industry – they tend to be easy to spot. If a ride doesn’t “look” right – it probably isn’t. And if you don’t like the way it looks, you don’t have to ride.

So, with this rash of incidents across the country – could better oversight lead to safer rides? I’m not sure. Currently, the states regulate amusement rides, to varying degrees depending on location. Could a uniform standard be better? Maybe. But uniform rules have their drawbacks, too.

It’s hard to create a “one size fits all” methodology for the entire United States. If we can’t agree on anything in Washington, it would be tough to push through legislation that would work fairly for everyone.

I repeat this stat often, because it’s worth repeating: You have better odds of being injured driving to an amusement park than you do while inside. You may hear about a deadly crash on the freeway, only mentioned as a “Sig Alert” in a traffic update. A death on a coaster, however will cause the news choppers to be summoned to the scene.

So go to your local amusement or theme park with confidence – just follow the safety rules. A park doesn’t want to hurt or kill you, despite what the internet says. Because if they did – you wouldn’t be able to go back and spend more money there…


The Good, the Bad and the Illegal Coaster POV

No, that THAT type of POV pervs…I’m talking about roller coaster POV! (Sorry to disappoint you – but you DID read the blog subject, right?!?)

Have you ever watched roller coaster point of view video or POV online before? Lord knows I certainly have. Ever wondered why the videos are sometimes jolty or always start AFTER the ride has started? Today, I want to show you how to identify good coaster POV, bad POV and illegal ride POV.

You can watch the video here: http://youtu.be/UJ2GjHIOJvM

POV has been around since the dawn of the motion picture – but it really gained notoriety after it was featured in the 1950’s film “This is Cinerama.” It saw its greatest surge in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, when Discovery Channel began featuring it regularly on Memorial Day. When Robb Alvey started producing on-ride videos from parks he visited, POV saw an even bigger surge. The internet is now awash with RIDE footage from thousands of users – thanks to cameras becoming smaller and more powerful. It’s become incredibly easy for anyone to film, well, anything. But does that make it right? Let’s find out…

Many parks have had to enact policies that discourage loose articles, especially cameras. The Santa Cruz Boardwalk will stop the Giant Dipper on its lift hill if operators see someone with a camera or cell phone trying to recording video. Expect a greeting and escort from security if you whip it out after the lift, by the way.

So, how do you stop this dangerous practice and keep your fellow guests safe? Simple – stop supporting it. If you see any of the tell-tale signs of illegal coaster POV, don’t keep watching it – unsubscribe from that user’s YouTube channel. You’ll keep admission process down and keep the line moving!