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Posts tagged “Arrow Development

Log flumes are worth keeping around

Over the past several years, many parks around the world have decided to remove their flume rides.

But I’m here today to come to the defense of the lowly log flume, even though they rarely defend me from their chlorinated waters.

Much like the roller coaster, the log flume has become an integral part of any amusement or theme park. Invented by Karl Bacon and Ed Morgan of Arrow Development in the 1963, the flume came about after hearing of stories of loggers riding trunks as they traversed the narrow, fast troughs of water.

Arrow Development Log Flume Prototype

Photo credit: Nancy Bacon-Francks. Used with permission.

But with the rise of water parks, many companies are making the choice to eliminate the flume – because of on-going maintenance and operating costs.

Here’s why they should reconsider:

Flumes are still very popular; this is an hour-long wait for Logger's Run at California's Great America.

Flumes are still very popular; this is an hour-long wait for Logger’s Run at California’s Great America.

  • Flumes are multi-purpose:

Any good amusement park should have three different types of water rides: A spillwater, white water rapid and a flume. Two of the three are just about guaranteed to get you soaked.

But a flume is different.

Don’t want to be soaked but want to cool down? Then you go on the flume.

It’s also a great ride EVERYONE can enjoy in the family. From the kids to grandma and grandpa, you can share the experience of a log ride. You can’t do that with a water park.

 

  • Flumes aren’t water parks:

Unlike a water park, you don’t need to change clothes to go to and from a log flume. There’s no need for a locker and they have wonderful capacity compared to a waterslide.

Guests get more bang for their buck, too – as flumes tend to be one of the longest length attractions in most parks.

Logger's Revenge at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk

  • Flumes are heritage:

They were invented here, in America. In fact, they were invented less than 10 miles from where I currently type. The first one was so popular at Six Flags Over Texas, they built a second one to handle the crowds.

They suck in tons of people on hot days and provide some of the best photo opportunities for any park photographer.

There is no better place to snap a funny photo than the log flume...

There is no better place to snap a funny photo than the log flume…

Most importantly, they are part of the fabric that keeps parks together. Removing a flume is like removing a coaster these day – and every one that has been removed has been sorely missed.

Simply put, the flume deserves to be preserved – and revered.

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What do you think – are the days of the log flume numbered? Tell me in the comments section or on my social media links!


Legacy of Arrow World Premiere in Downtown San Jose

It’s the day after Christmas – and you didn’t get what you wanted, did you? That ugly sweater, socks or worse – underwear!

Have no fear – we’ve got you covered…

Give the gift of an experience that they won’t soon forget – a ticket to the world premiere of ACE’s “The Legacy of Arrow Development,” presented by the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk!

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Tickets are just $10, with a $10 upgrade available if you’d like priority seating, reception and Q&A with the filmmakers. You can purchase your tickets here or at the Montgomery Theater Box Office.

We’ll see you in your best suits and dresses on the evening of January 23rd!


What Happened to Lost Parks of Northern California?

Many of you have been asking, “When will we see another episode of “Lost Parks of Northern California?”

Well, “Lost Parks” has been on a bit of a hiatus this year – but there’s a perfectly good explanation for it:

We’ve been working all year on a documentary on the history and legacy of former amusement ride manufacturer (and Bay Area company) Arrow Development!

Harold Poster Draft IV LOW

But, don’t worry – the award-winning show will return – just as soon as we recover from the workload of the “Legacy of Arrow Development” project!


Matterhorn Bobsleds – Throwback Thursday

Copyright 2015, Kris Rowberry. All rights reserved.

Yes, that’s yours truly, Kris Rowberry – on my first ever ride on the historic Matterhorn Bobsleds. I suppose it’s ironic, considering I’m working with several of my ACE friends to tell the story of the company that built them.

Once an Arrow fan – ALWAYS an Arrow fan!

Copyright 2015, Kris Rowberry. All rights reserved.

Kris Rowberry and family take on Arrow’s Matterhorn Bobsleds at Disneyland.

Apparently, even back in 1997, I was analyzing rides for a later review…

Copyright 2015, Kris Rowberry. All rights reserved.

Your author, trying to figure out how the Matterhorn operated, even back in 1996!


California’s Great America Needs to Demonize “the Demon” during Halloween Haunt

It seems like a match made in heaven…err, HELL perhaps.

Since California’s Great America began their annual Halloween Haunt, it has missed out on what would be the EASIEST haunted attraction – ever. That’s right, I’m talking about the Demon.

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Photo Credit: Kris Rowberry. All Rights Reserved, 2015.

If you were ever looking for an excuse to bring back some of the older theme of this classic Arrow Development ride, wouldn’t Haunt be the perfect opportunity?

Let’s start with the queue line. By now, every park fan has probably heard of the infamous “Demon Song” – a nearly twenty-six minute loop of a custom theme song for ride, coupled with skits between. And there’s no need to look for it, CGA – here it is…in it’s entirety:

This “demon-itization” could also include sprucing up all the accent lighting around the ornate rock work. And you know what, why not throw in some zombies on the other side of the fence just to make things interesting?

Now, let’s get to some of the most contentious, yet easiest to accomplish items, if you use a little creativity.

 

1.) Fog in the Tunnels:

Photo Credit: Kris Rowberry. All Rights Reserved, 2003.

We can all see the light sockets are still there from the 1980 season (check out how amazing it was, too):

http://www.greatamericaparks.com/demon001.mpg

…and while they’ve just been DYING to be reused (couldn’t resist), why not do a much cheaper alternative for now by just throwing some white (or red strobes) inside the tunnel, with two of those Haunt fog machines at the entrance to it? The train will naturally draw in the fog into the tunnel and the effect will be both disorienting and amazing at the same time.

 

2.) The Bloodfall:

Photo Credit: Kris Rowberry. All Rights Reserved, 2004.

Photo Credit: Kris Rowberry. All Rights Reserved, 2004.

This one is arguably more complicated. We’re guessing the pump may have gone out a few years ago and it isn’t too easy to get out to be replaced. But – that doesn’t mean you can’t fill the pond below with that eerie red liquid for effect or throw some more strobes and fog out there…

.2.) The Demon Himself:

Sadly, last weekend when I stayed until closing, the head wasn’t even lit up. Not even the eyes. Too bad, because when he is – it’s awesome:

Photo Credit: Kris Rowberry. All Rights Reserved, 2004.

People give the Paramount-era at this park a bad rap – most of the lighting and water effects WORKED during this time (sans the big tunnel).

Need we remind everyone the 40th park anniversary is coming up in 2016 next year. With nostalgia a BIG seller these days, what better way to throw it back, then to finally see a return of our terrifying Demon…

What do YOU think? Tell us in the comments section below or on our social media links!


Riding Roller Coasters to Preserve History

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With the exception of wooden roller coasters, most of today’s state of the art thrill rides are designed by European firms. But in the 1960’s, Northern California-based Arrow Development was the company that parks around the world came to for the latest in steel coaster innovation.

Last month, a small crew of volunteers from American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) Worldwide, Inc. crisscrossed the country to tell the story of an American manufacturing legend that entertained millions. The team visited amusement and theme parks with prominent Arrow rides, including: Six Flags Over Texas, Cedar Point, Kennywood, Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Lagoon Park and Silverwood Theme Park.

Nicholas Laschkewitsch is the Video Promotions Coordinator for American Coaster Enthusiasts:

“The story of Arrow is the story of the American dream,” said Laschkewitsch. “Four steel workers quit their jobs to form their own company in a car garage and quite literally, turned the world upside down.”

Kris Rowberry is the Executive Producer, as well as the host of “The Lost Parks of Northern California”:

“Everyone knows Silicon Valley as a hotbed for technological innovations,” said Rowberry. “But few know that the valley that gave us Google and iPhones also spawned the world’s first log flume and corkscrew roller coaster. It truly is a forgotten piece of our national history.”

Robert Ingle is a Producer on the film as well as a Photographer:

“This project will literally bring history to life, as well as preserve it for generations to come.”

The public is welcome to join the team on the journey by following American Coaster Enthusiasts on social media or by using the #RideWithACE and #LegacyofArrow hashtags. Fans can also visit: my.aceonline.org/arrow

About ACE: Founded in 1978, ACE is a non-profit, volunteer organization dedicated to the preservation, promotion, appreciation and safe enjoyment of roller coasters. With more than 5,000 members across the globe, ACE is the largest amusement park enthusiast organization in the world. In addition, numerous television outlets such as the Travel Channel have prominently featured ACE and it’s members.


85 year old rides roller coasters at Geauga Lake

The phrase “young at heart” is thrown around often in our society, but I’m pretty sure this video encapsulates it perfectly. (Plus, some bonus “Lost Parks” footage, too!)