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Posts tagged “amusement park

Kings Island Unveils Mystic Timbers and Teases with #WhatsInTheShed

There are four things every public relations person at an amusement /theme park should do in preparation for a big ride announcement:

1.) Think to yourself, “What would Jeffrey Siebert at Six Flags Fiesta Texas do?”

2.) Release computer animated point of view video (POV)

3.) Tease a unique, mystery element in the ride

4.) Have ride merchandise hidden and ready to be purchased, just moments after the official announcement is made.

Kings Island 2017 Teaser What's In The Shed

Kings Island in Ohio hit all of those on Thursday evening, even with major online streaming issues, when they officially announced Mystic Timbers – their record-setting 5th wooden coaster.

Not only did the park release the official animated POV (which has already been stolen and monetized by multiple “coaster media outlets” – the park also teases at something else…

You see, the POV wasn’t complete – there’s a little section at the end that they purposely omitted – only to show yet another hashtag: #WhatsInTheShed.

The coaster community online LOST IT’S DAMN MIND – and loved every bit of it:

Capture 1 Capture 2 Capture 3

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how you keep the coaster enthusiasts satisfied, curious and talking up a ride that isn’t even built for another 10 months on this project. We’ll all find out what’s in that shed come the 2017 season.

But for now, this is truly one of the best times of the year for park fans!

Are YOU excited for the 2017 season? What’s your most anticipated coaster or park announcement?

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Log flumes are worth keeping around

Over the past several years, many parks around the world have decided to remove their flume rides.

But I’m here today to come to the defense of the lowly log flume, even though they rarely defend me from their chlorinated waters.

Much like the roller coaster, the log flume has become an integral part of any amusement or theme park. Invented by Karl Bacon and Ed Morgan of Arrow Development in the 1963, the flume came about after hearing of stories of loggers riding trunks as they traversed the narrow, fast troughs of water.

Arrow Development Log Flume Prototype

Photo credit: Nancy Bacon-Francks. Used with permission.

But with the rise of water parks, many companies are making the choice to eliminate the flume – because of on-going maintenance and operating costs.

Here’s why they should reconsider:

Flumes are still very popular; this is an hour-long wait for Logger's Run at California's Great America.

Flumes are still very popular; this is an hour-long wait for Logger’s Run at California’s Great America.

  • Flumes are multi-purpose:

Any good amusement park should have three different types of water rides: A spillwater, white water rapid and a flume. Two of the three are just about guaranteed to get you soaked.

But a flume is different.

Don’t want to be soaked but want to cool down? Then you go on the flume.

It’s also a great ride EVERYONE can enjoy in the family. From the kids to grandma and grandpa, you can share the experience of a log ride. You can’t do that with a water park.

 

  • Flumes aren’t water parks:

Unlike a water park, you don’t need to change clothes to go to and from a log flume. There’s no need for a locker and they have wonderful capacity compared to a waterslide.

Guests get more bang for their buck, too – as flumes tend to be one of the longest length attractions in most parks.

Logger's Revenge at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk

  • Flumes are heritage:

They were invented here, in America. In fact, they were invented less than 10 miles from where I currently type. The first one was so popular at Six Flags Over Texas, they built a second one to handle the crowds.

They suck in tons of people on hot days and provide some of the best photo opportunities for any park photographer.

There is no better place to snap a funny photo than the log flume...

There is no better place to snap a funny photo than the log flume…

Most importantly, they are part of the fabric that keeps parks together. Removing a flume is like removing a coaster these day – and every one that has been removed has been sorely missed.

Simply put, the flume deserves to be preserved – and revered.

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What do you think – are the days of the log flume numbered? Tell me in the comments section or on my social media links!


California’s Great America Announces Massive Capital Investment and Retail Project

How long have we heard that California’s Great America doesn’t have anywhere to expand? “The park is landlocked – there’s nowhere for them to go.” And what about, “Cedar Fair doesn’t care about this park – they want to sell it.”

Well, this aught to shut up the naysayers…

In an unprecedented announcement on Wednesday, the park announced that it has applied for a rezoning from the City of Santa Clara, which will allow it to add significantly more attractions with less red tape, intends on purchasing the land on which the park sits on and will build a massive retail and entertainment complex near the front gate of the park.

CGA fans, get ready to drool:

Photo credit: 1590 KLIV-AM (Used with permission)

Photo credit: 1590 KLIV-AM (Used with permission)

To think this was a park that looked like it was about to close just a few years ago – now look at all the new stuff that’s planned and proposed…

The official notice from the City of Santa Clara, announcing the proposed change in zoning

The official notice from the City of Santa Clara, announcing the proposed change in zoning

There’s a lot of verbiage to get through, but here’s the most important part (in my opinion). Long time fans of this park may recall the proposed “Front Gate” project during the Paramount era, before the land was converted into two office towers. Well, long time fans, your patience has finally paid off:

CGA Entertainment District

This gives the park a major, strategic advantage over it’s competitors – no other park in Northern California offers this sort of experience. If it reminds you of Knott’s Marketplace, Universal CityWalk or Downtown Disney – that’s no mistake.

And for fans of the park itself, they didn’t forget about you, either. The rezoning will allow the park far more flexibility in building new attractions – and it’s all spelled out, here:

You read that right - 6 MORE attractions proposed OVER 200 feet tall. Need a towel?

You read that right – 6 MORE attractions proposed OVER 200 feet tall. Is your jaw on the floor, yet?

Cedar Fair CEO Matt Ouimet also told those in attendance that any change in the use of land would have to first be approved by the City of Santa Clara AND Cedar Fair – which all but ensures the park will be around through 2074.

So, CGA fans – who’s ready to watch their park transform into an entertainment destination? Tell us in the comments section below or on our social media links!


The Chinese Communist Theme Park

So China just opened a theme park, dedicated to the ruling, Communist Party.

Yep. Sounds terrifying.

Is the overall theme of the place, “no dissenters allowed.” Or maybe, “Internet only we want you to see.” Is there a “Tienanmen Square” tank-themed ride? I’m going to guess not…

It’s difficult to see and understand the layout of the park – as there are no photos of any rides or real attractions, outside of posing with statues and other fun sculptures.

I wonder how line jumping is handled here…check it out for yourself:

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/08/travel/china-wuhan-communist-party-theme-park/index.html


For the Love of God Stop Peeking at Rocky Mountain Construction and Lighting Rod

There’s a great dichotomy in the coaster enthusiast world…

We love rides, that much is certain. But sometimes, that love can go a little too far. We say that we respect the companies that create these incredible attractions, yet we can’t wait to spill the beans on new attractions. In years past, this has meant going as far as perusing company servers to find out the latest rumor or detail.

The latest case to develop on this comes from the Great Smokey Mountains, and Dollywood. Certainly one of the most anticipated new coasters to open this year is Lightning Rod – the world’s first launched wooden coaster.

But when I see posts like this – from Instagram – it makes me wonder if these people truly LOVE this industry – or are so obsessed with it, they can no longer think straight:

Now, I’ve blurred the image out of respect for Rocky Mountain Construction. But it’s the principal that matters, here.

Just because an image is online, does NOT mean it’s okay to re-share it. Would you share leaked photos of a naked selfie of a person you knew? Of course not – because you’re not a douchebag. So how can you say you love this industry, when you do everything against what the industry JUST asked you do to?

In this case, it was an easy task – JUST WAIT.

The fact of the matter is, if you’re reminded that the park or company EXPRESSLY ASKED that nothing be shared – and then you share it anyway – you’re not a true enthusiast – you’re a selfish jerk.

You’d rather share a photo than simply listen to the request of a park and / or manufacturing company you supposedly love and respect.

Doing things like this is counter-intuitive to the enthusiast mentality. Why are you hurting the very thing you purport to love? When cool perks like backstage tours or construction walk-backs start to dry up…it will be you who will ultimately be blamed.

Food for thought, everyone.


Why All Roller Coaster Enthusiasts Should Know the Name Eric Laithwaite

There are several names synonymous in the roller coaster and theme park community: Karl Bacon, Ed & Dana Morgan, Anton Schwarzkopf, Walter Bolliger & Claude Mabillard and Walt Disney, among many others.

But one in particular seems to have fallen by the wayside – Eric Laithwaite. And yet every enthusiast who’s ever enjoyed a modern, launched roller coaster owes those very thrills to him, because he is “the father of linear induction.”

Laithwaite’s most famous work centered around using magnetism to provide frictionless travel, on maglev trains. He had figured out that if you uncoiled a standard, electrical motor, an object could simply glide over it on an electromagnetic wave – and it would stay on course with the attraction and resistance already natural to those magnets.

Perhaps his most famous work of the time was the magnetic river from “The Spy Who Loved Me”

But for parks, chain lifts were just fine modes of gaining potential energy – and the technology wasn’t seen for amusement purposes until 1975, with the debut of Walt Disney World’s Tomorrowland Transit Authority. While it kept a consistent pace to the ride – it’s hardly a thrill ride, too.

People at the time did not see the true potential of the futuristic, potential acceleration system. Computer control systems were still rudimentary by today’s standards – plus the weight drop and flywheel launches of Schwarzkopf and Arrow were doing the job just fine.

It would take over two decades before amusement ride manufacturers would take the technology to it’s full potential, with the debut of Premier Rides’ “Flight of Fear” indoor coasters at (then) Paramount’s Kings Island and Kings Dominion in 1996.

And, after a year of technical issues, the technology would reach it’s top speed, with the debut of Intamin’s spectacular Superman: The Escape at Six Flags Magic Mountain. It still holds the record for fastest linear launched coaster on Earth at 100 mph (on a good day).

With the explosion in launched coasters over the past two decades, just remember to add the name Eric Laithwaite to your coaster lexicon. Because without him – you would literally be going nowhere, fast.


California’s Great America announces Winterfest year-round operations

Today, California’s Great America announced “Winterfest” a spectacular larger than life holiday event. The event will be in direct competition with Six Flags’ “Holiday in the Park” which has been running for several years now up in Vallejo. “Winterfest” will be free to attend for anyone with a Gold of Platinum season pass.

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Included in the winter wonderland will be a skating rink in front of Carousel Columbia, light displays, holiday shows, limited ride operation and holiday themed food options.

It will be capped off with one of the Bay Area’s tallest Christmas trees and even giant toy soldiers greeting guests.

Not too bad.

The five-week WinterFest celebration begins November 25 for weekend operation. Daily operations run December 19th through 23rd and 26th through 30th.

Suddenly, buying a season pass to the park this year got a whole lot more enticing. Certainly the addition of “Mass Effect” wasn’t enough to bring me back for another year –  but this might do the trick.

Now, the park HAS tried something similar in the past – in the first season, back in 1976. Those small rings near Carousel Columbia’s top were to help mount Christmas lights. Unfortunately, it didn’t do so well, mostly due to poor weather. However, with the success of Six Flags’ “Holiday in the Park” in nearby Vallejo – it seems like a no-brainer to capitalize on the demand.

The other major issue is ride rehabilitation schedules. Staying open longer means some rides won’t be ready in late March, when the park opens for its 2017 season. Disneyland has perfected this art with a complete schedule of when rides will be down.

However, no other park has been able to duplicate this, usually resorting to single train operation for a majority of the early-season. We shall see how this park is able to handle the lack of time for annual rehabs.